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Talk-In-The-Box Events for Breaking the Code

Pre Show Demonstrations of Enigma Machine by Dick Rubinstein
Various Dates

Thursday. April 7 at 6:45PM (before 7:30PM performance) buy tickets
Saturday, April 9 at 7PM (before 8PM performance) buy tickets
Sunday, April 17 at 1:15PM (before 2PM performance) buy tickets
Thursday, April 28th at 6:45PM (before 7:30PM performance) buy tickets
Sunday, May 1st at 1:15PM (before 2PM performance) buy tickets

Dick Rubinstein is a computer science professional. He graduated with a PhD from University of California—Irvine, in Social Sciences. His computer science interests include human factors in usability (design to make computer technology easy to use). Along with his computer science work, he has been involved in theater as a lighting and technical designer, as well as a consultant on Breaking the Code.

Post Show Conversation with Hal Abelson
Thursday, April 7

Thursday, April 7 (after 7:30PM performance) buy tickets

Harold (Hal) Abelson a Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT and a Fellow of the IEEE. He holds an A.B. degree from Princeton University and a Ph.D. degree in mathematics from MIT. A leader in the worldwide movement towards openness and democraticization of culture and intellectual resources, he is a founding director of Creative Commons, Public Knowledge, and the Free Software Foundation, and a director of the Center for Democracy and Technology — organizations that are devoted to strengthening the global intellectual commons.

Pre Show Symposium
Code Breaking: The Impact of Breaking the Enigma Code
Special Guests: Christopher Capozzola and Ronald Rivest
Sauturday, April 9

Saturday, April 9 at 7PM (before 8PM performance) buy tickets

Christopher Capozzola is an Associate Professor History at MIT, specializing in the political and cultural history of the United States from 1861 to 1945. He received his Ph.D. from Columbia University in 2002 and received his bachelor’s degree from Harvard College. Professor Capozzola research interests are in the history of war and politics in everyday life.

Ronald Rivest is the Andrew and Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in MIT's Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Professor Rivest has research interests in cryptography, computer and network security, electronic voting, and algorithms. He received a B.A. in Mathematics from Yale University and his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Stanford University.

Artists and Audiences – Conversation with the Cast and the Director
Thursday, April 14

Thursday, April 14 (after 7:30PM performance) buy tickets

Pre Show Symposium
Inspired: What does the name "Alan Turing" represent and evoke today?
How is Turing's work viewed by contemporary scientists, historians and philosophers?
Sauturday, April 16

Saturday, April 16 at 7PM (before 8PM performance) buy tickets

Tomaso Poggio develops computational models of brain function in order to understand human intelligence and to build intelligent machines that can mimic human performance. Poggio is also Co-Director of the Center for Biological and Computational Learning and was appointed Investigator immediately after the establishment of the McGovern Institute in 2000. He joined the MIT faculty in 1981, after ten years at the Max Planck Institute for Biology and Cybernetics in Tubingen, Germany. He received a Ph.D. in 1970 from the University of Genoa. Poggio is a Foreign Member of the Italian Academy of Sciences and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Professor Floyd is a Professor of Philosophy at Boston University. She received her Ph.D. and M.A. from Harvard University, and her bachelor’s from Wellesley College. Professor Floyd's research interests include the history of analytic philosophy, Kant, Wittgenstein, the philosophy of logic and mathematics, philosophy of language, eighteenth century philosophy, and aesthetics. A prominent strand in her research is the investigation of contrasting accounts of the nature of objectivity and reason. She is currently working on a manuscript treating the impact on Wittgenstein in the mid-1930s of Turing’s and Gödel’s undecidability and incompleteness results.

Post Show Conversation with Christopher Capozzola
Sunday, April 17

Sunday, April 17 (after 2PM performance)buy tickets

Christopher Capozzola is an Associate Professor History at MIT, specializing in the political and cultural history of the United States from 1861 to 1945. He received his Ph.D. from Columbia University in 2002 and received his bachelor’s degree from Harvard College. Professor Capozzola research interests are in the history of war and politics in everyday life.

Central Salon – This is your theater
Thursday, April 21

Thursday, April 21 (after 7:30PM performance) buy tickets

Conversation with Central Square Theater leadership and scientists about possible themes for future Catalyst Collaborative@MIT science theater projects.

The Story Colliders with Ben Lillie
Pre-Show, Friday, April 22

Friday, April 22 (at 7PM, before 8PM performance) buy tickets

Ben Lillie is a high-energy particle physicist who left the ivory tower for the wilds of New York's theater district. He now writes and performs stories about science and being a scientist, and is a Moth Story SLAM champion. He also writes for TED.com, and likes to say that life is different now, largely because it is.

Pre Show Symposium
Legacy: The continuing significance of Turing’s personal story and professional breakthroughs
Sauturday, April 23

Saturday, April 23 at 7PM (before 8PM performance) buy tickets

Timothy Patrick McCarthy is a Lecturer on History and Literature, Adjunct Lecturer on Public Policy, and Director of the Human Rights and Social Movements Program at the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School. An historian of social movements, Professor McCarthy graduated from Harvard College and received his Ph.D. in History from Columbia University. Professor McCarthy's research agenda focuses on the relationship between human rights and social movements in three main areas: race relations and civil rights; LGBT politics, policy, and advocacy; and modern-day slavery and human trafficking.

Silvio Micali, Ford Professor of Engineering; CSAIL at MIT; co-founder and co-leader of the Information and Computer Security Group; recipient of the Goedel Prize in theoretical computer science and the RSA Prize in Cryptography.

Post Show Conversation with Jonathan Kelner
Sunday, April 24

Sunday, April 24 (after 2PM performance)buy tickets

Jonathan Kelner received the B.A. in mathematics from Harvard in 2002, and received the David Mumford Award as the top Harvard graduate in mathematics. He completed the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from MIT in EECS in 2005 & 2006. Daniel Spielman was his thesis advisor. Kelner was a Member of IAS 2006-07, before joining the MIT faculty in applied mathematics as assistant professor in 2007. He continues to be a member of MIT-CSAIL. A theoretical computer scientist, Professor Kelner's research focuses on fundamental mathematical problems related to algorithms and complexity theory. He received the Best Student Paper Award at STOC 04. In 2007, Professor Kelner was selected by the MIT School of Science for support from the NEC Corporation Fund for research in computers and communications. In 2010, he received an Alfred P. Sloan research fellowship.


Scholar Social with Timothy Patrick McCarthy
Thursday, April 28

Thursday, April 28 (after 7:30PM performance) buy tickets

Timothy Patrick McCarthy is a Lecturer on History and Literature, Adjunct Lecturer on Public Policy, and Director of the Human Rights and Social Movements Program at the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School. An historian of social movements, Professor McCarthy graduated from Harvard College and received his Ph.D. in History from Columbia University. Professor McCarthy's research agenda focuses on the relationship between human rights and social movements in three main areas: race relations and civil rights; LGBT politics, policy, and advocacy; and modern-day slavery and human trafficking.

Post Show Conversation with Ian Lekus
Friday, April 29

Friday. April 29 (after 8PM performance) buy tickets

Ian Lekus is a Lecturer and member of the Committee on Degrees in History and Literature at Harvard University. He received his Ph.D. and M.A. in History from Duke University, and his B.A. from Cornell University. Some of his research interests include: Cold War and post-Cold War History, Civil Rights and social movements, U.S.-Latin American relations, Human Rights, and the HIV/AIDs pandemic.

Pre Show Symposium: Sexuality and Security Clearance
Special Guests: Ian Lekus, Neil Kane, and Christopher Waters
Saturday, April 30

Saturday, April 30 at 7PM (before 8PM performance) buy tickets

Ian Lekus is a Lecturer and member of the Committee on Degrees in History and Literature at Harvard University. He received his Ph.D. and M.A. in History from Duke University, and his B.A. from Cornell University. Some of his research interests include: Cold War and post-Cold War History, Civil Rights and social movements, U.S.-Latin American relations, Human Rights, and the HIV/AIDs pandemic.

Neal Kane has been involved with The History Project since 1996. The History Project is the only group focused exclusively on preserving the history of Boston’s LGBT community, and on making that history accessible to future generations.

Christopher Waters is the Hans W. Gatzke '38 Professor of Modern European History and the current chair of the Department of History at Williams College. He received his M.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard University. His recent work focuses on the history of sexuality and the making of the modern self in Britain.

Post Show Conversation with Neil Miller
Sunday, May 1

Sunday, May 1 (after 2PM performance) buy tickets

Neil Miller is currently a Lecturer in English at Tufts University and a journalist. He has published six books, his most recent one titled, Banned in Boston: The Watch and Ward Society’s Crusade against Books, Burlesque, and the Social Evil. He has won numerous awards for his books: Kartchner Caverns, Sex-Crime-Panic, and, In Search for Gay America.

Post Show Conversation with Ana Rita Pires
Wednesday, May 4

Wednesday, May 4 (after 7:30PM performance) buy tickets

Anita Marie Pires is a lecturer in Mathematics at MIT, doing research on symplectic geometry, including working on folded symplectic structures, in particular origami manifolds.


Post Show Conversation with Scott Aaronson
Thursday, May 5

Thursday, May 5 (after 7:30PM performance) buy tickets

Scott Aaronson is an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of California—Berkeley and a bachelor’s degree from Cornell University. Professor Aaronson’s research interests center around fundamental limits on what can efficiently be computed in the physical world. This has entailed studying quantum computing, the most powerful model of computation we have based on known physical theory.


Post Show Conversation with Jennifer French
Friday, May 6

Friday, May 6 (after 8PM performance) buy tickets

Jennifer French received her PhD from MIT in math, with a focus in Algebraic Topology.

Pre Show Symposium
Modern Computers and Artificial Intelligence:
The Turing Test and Thinking Machine
Have we achieved Turing’s Thinking Machine?
Does the Turing Test still apply?
Special Guests: Scott Aaronson
Saturday, May 7

Saturday, May 7at 7PM (before 8PM performance) buy tickets

Scott Aaronson is an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of California—Berkeley and a bachelor’s degree from Cornell University. Professor Aaronson’s research interests center around fundamental limits on what can efficiently be computed in the physical world. This has entailed studying quantum computing, the most powerful model of computation we have based on known physical theory.